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Home Informations Local Food Shahe Rice Noodles

Shahe Rice Noodles

guangzhou-shahe-rice-noodles

Guangzhou people seem like have special fondness for rice noodles and noodles with great passion. It named as so as it originally came from Shahe Town. Shahe is a small town at east of Baiyun Mountain. There is a fountain in this mountain.

The water of making Shahe Rice Noodles is from this fountain. Shahe Rice Noodles featuring white, bright, flexible, smooth and soft is about more than 100 year-old.

Common cooking methods include dry frying, wet frying, boiling in soup, and mixing with salad. Sometimes, the vegetable juice and fruit juice are added when cooking, making the noodle more colorful and even more different in taste.

Fried rice noodles, a local Cantonese dish, have landed up on the 2009 list of "the 10 most favourite US recipes" published on the Los Angeles Times Website. In response, Chinese culinary experts wished to see this recipe added to the list of China's Intangible Cultural Heritage.

An important factor in the making of this dish is "wok hei" . The cooking must be done over a high flame and the stirring must be done quickly. Not only must the ho fun be stirred quickly, it must not be handled too strongly or it will break into pieces. The amount of oil also needs to be controlled very well, or the extra oil or dry texture will ruin the flavor. Because of these factors, this dish is a major test for chefs in Cantonese cooking.

Obviously, in a country known as a melting pot of cultures and people, fried rice noodles in the US are rather different from in Guangdong, with the Los Angeles Times recommending adding Chinese chives, shrimps and pork as opposed to the ordinary slices of beef.